Speeding Ticket FAQs

Speeding Ticket FAQs

Our fee for speeding ticket defense starts at $150.  If you’d like to learn more about our fee, or our services, you can contact us, reach us by phone at 888-820-5885, by email at speeding@kregerthacker.com.


Yes.  For most speeding tickets you can simply pay the fine and court costs rather than appear in court. However, keep in mind that if you pay the fine and court costs without appearing in court, you are pleading guilty to the speeding charge. This guilty plea typically will increase your auto insurance rates, and may cause your driver’s license to be suspended.


No.  We can get your appearance waived.  By obtaining a completed waiver of appearance form from you (which we obtain free of charge), we are able to handle your case without you having to come to court.  By hiring us to fight your speeding ticket, you can avoid appearing in court and save a lot of time.


No.  You, or an attorney on your behalf, will have to appear in court in the county where you received your speeding ticket.


Maybe.  The answer to this question depends on your State’s DMV and Department of Insurance guidelines.  In many States (North Carolina is one of them) an out of state speeding ticket can affect both your driver’s license and automobile insurance premiums.  Before you choose to simply pay the speeding ticket or ignore the speeding ticket, be sure to speak with either an attorney or both your State’s DMV and Department of Insurance to find out how your insurance rates and driver’s license would be affected.


Yes.  If you are convicted of any of the following speeding charges, the DMV can suspend your driver’s license:

  1. You were driving faster than 75 mph when the speed limit was less than 70 mph
  2. You were driving faster than 80 mph when the speed limit was 70 mph
  3. In any 12 month span, you receive two (or more) speeding tickets in which you were driving faster than 55 mph or
  4. You were driving faster than 15 mph over the speed limit in a work zone


Maybe. The answer depends on the type and the severity of the mistake.  Generally, mistakes about the time of day, the name of the road you were driving on, or your driver’s license number are not sufficient to automatically get your ticket dismissed.


The answer depends on the speed you were driving and the number of prior speeding tickets you have received.

A conviction of speeding greater than 10 mph over the speed limit will always increase your auto insurance rates.  Therefore, it is important that you fight your speeding ticket if you were clocked at greater than 10 mph over the speed limit.

One conviction (in a 3 year time frame) of speeding 1-10 mph over the speed limit (not in a school zone) will have no effect on your auto insurance rates.  More than one conviction of speeding 1-10 mph over the speed limit may increase your auto insurance rates (thus, it’s in your best interest to fight your speeding ticket, or consider taking a Prayer for Judgment Continued if you choose not to fight it).


A Prayer for Judgment Continued is something you ask the District Attorney and Judge for when you plead guilty.  Generally, your auto insurance premium will not be affected if you make a Prayer for Judgment Continued for a speeding ticket (and no other member of your household or driver on your insurance policy has made a Prayer for Judgment Continued for a traffic violation in the past 3 years).  The legal meaning of a Prayer for Judgment Continued is that you have been deemed guilty by a jury or a court, but no sentence or penalty is being imposed on you.


No.  Also, whether the officer allows you to see the speed reading has virtually no bearing on your case.


We’re speeding ticket attorneys, so of course our answer is yes.  By hiring us, you don’t have to go to court, and you’ll typically get a better result than fighting your ticket on your own.  Plus, if you’re not 100% satisfied with our defense of your speeding ticket, we’ll refund our fee.


Yes.  It’s possible that (a) the radar reading was caused by a different vehicle, (b) the radar gun was operated incorrectly or (c) your speedometer is not working properly.  All of these are difficult to prove, but discussing them with the District Attorney may get you a better plea deal (or a dismissal of your speeding ticket).


Your driver’s license will be revoked once the DMV receives notice from the court of your failure to appear in court.


Your driver’s license will be revoked once the DMV receives notice from the court of your failure to pay your fine, penalty or court costs.

Yes.  Both police officers must testify at your trial.  The police officer operating the radar gun must confirm that your car was the car that caused the reading on the radar gun.  The officer that issued you a speeding ticket must confirm that you were the driver of the speeding vehicle.  If both police officers are not available to testify at your trial, you can ask the District Attorney and Judge to dismiss your case.


Maybe.  Some District Attorneys will offer to dismiss your ticket or reduce your ticket if you are willing to complete a driver improvement course/traffic school.  Before you decide to take a driving class, be sure talk to the District Attorney to make sure (a) what plea you will receive by attending the course, (b) what course you need to take and (c) what proof of successful class completion you need to bring with you to court.


You can petition the court to grant you a limited driving privilege.  If approved by the court, this limited driving privilege will permit you to drive to and from work.


Kreger Thacker’s North Carolina Speeding Ticket and Traffic Defense Attorneys serve clients charged with speeding and other traffic violations in Durham County, Guilford County (including the cities of Gibsonville, Greensboro, High Point, Jamestown, Oak Ridge, Pleasant Garden, Sedalia, Stokesdale, Summerfield and Whitsett) and Orange County (including the cities of Carrboro, Chapel Hill and Hillsborough).